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Trinity 9 – 9th August 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such broad and inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 9, let by Revd. Lyndy Domoney, with the Gospel read by Ann Cork

A Sermon for Trinity 9, from Ann Cork

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

 

Music links for the Trinity 9 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

Jesus Calls Us O’er the Tumult

Calm Me Lord by Margaret Rizza

More Modern:

Oceans (Where Feet May Fail)

My Lighthouse (with actions)

Kids:

Deep Cries Out

 

A Sermon(Text)

Compline – Wednesday 5th August 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by Lindy Ellis

God bless,

Compline for Wednesday 5th August

Trinity 8 – 2nd August 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such broad and inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 8, let by Revd. Lyndy Domoney, with the Gospel read by Lindy Ellis

A Sermon for Trinity 8, from Lindy Ellis

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

Music links for the Trinity 8 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

Guide Me, Oh Thou Great Jehovah

Panis Angelicus

More Modern:

Hungry

You shall go out with Joy

Kids:

O Taste and See

 

A Sermon(Text)

We hear so many statistics that numbers tend to slide past our brains and mean nothing to us. Here is one more: across the world, this year over 670,000 people have already died of covid-19, and the number increases each day. 670,000! But we are overcome by such numbers; to genuinely feel compassion, I need to concentrate on individual cases – you will notice that the media news programmes usually give us the story of one particular person, after telling us a news item. So remember that each of those 670,000 had a mother, a father, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, other family members, and friends, who are there grieving over those deaths.

For each survivor, surely the natural reaction is to want to be quiet and to be alone to pray and absorb the reality of what has happened. Imagine you are one of them, the number certainly includes many people in this country – you want to be quiet so you go for a walk to one of your favourite beauty spots, but when you get there, there is a large group of noisy people having a barbecue and ignoring social distancing. What is your reaction? I suspect that you would feel grumpy even angry and you would stomp off feeling even worse.
In light of this, Jesus’s reactions and actions in today’s Gospel are remarkable. The first sentence of the reading is ‘After Jesus heard about John, he crossed Lake Galilee to go to some place where he could be alone.’ He had just heard the most horrible news: John his cousin, who had been held in prison by Herod, had been beheaded at the whim of Herod’s wife and her daughter, and his head presented on a plate. The news would also remind Jesus that, if he continued on his present course, he would also die a violent death. No wonder Jesus wanted to be alone to talk to his Father in prayer. Surely, that was not too much to ask?

So he sailed across the lake to a quiet spot, but the crowds had got there before him. Did Jesus say, ‘Hang on, Guys, I’ve just had some bad news and I want to be on my own to mourn quietly’? No, although he would know that many of them were just sensation seekers, wanting to see him perform miracles, he could see the many sick people who had been brought the long difficult trek around the edge of the lake, and his first reaction was to be sorry for them, so he metaphorically rolled up his sleeves and cured each one dealing with each one as an individual. This took all day and it was evening by the time he had finished.

Now the disciples under Jesus’s influence would also be caring for the people too, but no doubt they were even more concerned for Jesus, their friend. They could see he was exhausted and still hadn’t been able to mourn for his cousin. Surely, the best thing would be to send all this crowd off home now. It was a huge number and they were really hungry. They, the disciples of Jesus, couldn’t do anything more to help them, could they? They had no food with them – the crowd would all just have to go home – it would be for the best.

Well, Jesus would be glad that the disciples are trying to care for the people, but he wants them to have a greater vision of what is possible for God, so his reply is, ‘They don’t have to leave. Why don’t you give them something to eat?’ The disciples respond with amazement: ‘How can we, out here in the desert? We’ve got barely anything to give them.’

This is how our vocations as Christians work: we read the Bible, we pray, we get to know Jesus a little and we try to be like him. We think of something we can offer, but Jesus replies that we need to expand our vision. No, no, I say – I can’t do that – I’m not clever enough; I can’t speak in public; I haven’t got the resources; but God pushes a bit more and we find ourselves doing things we didn’t think possible. Just think of Tom Moore – his family challenged him to raise money for the NHS before his 100th birthday. He probably thought he’d be lucky to manage even that challenge without collapsing, but he found more and more resources within himself and now he is Captain Sir Tom Moore and an inspiration to many. Of course, worldly success does not always come to Christians, in fact it rarely does – a tougher example is Martin Luther King, who showed the world how Christians can peacefully, but effectively work against evil (in his case, the evil of racism), but he was martyred by someone who could not accept the truths he spoke. Let us pray that we may have the faith and strength to follow our vocations.

Going back to our Gospel story, what happens next reminds me of the Last Supper. The words St Matthew uses in telling the two parts of the story are very similar. Jesus takes what food they have and blesses and breaks the bread, then somehow there proves to be enough for everyone, and even more than enough. This points forward to the way Jesus gave his own body for us as a sacrifice that paid for all our sins, so that we can become new people, new people who are given the grace to follow God’s will; and through all the centuries since the bread of communion has proved to be more than enough for everyone who has come to God’s table. As St John put it, ‘I am that bread from heaven! Everyone who eats it will live forever.’

So when you feel that God is calling you to act out of your comfort zone, to follow Jesus further than you thought you possibly could, remember that Jesus has been there before us and he will be right with us at all times.

Let us pray:

Dear Lord, give us your vision of what we are capable of, strengthen us and give us perseverance so we do not give up when the road ahead seems hard, give us your love, for others as well as for ourselves, so that we always try to follow your will, not our own. Amen

Services in Church on Sunday 2nd August

Please remember to bring your Face Mask to church!

Please note that we are operating a strict Face Mask policy for all services in church. No exceptions. This is for the safety and reassurance of those attending. There will usually be a spare disposable mask for you to wear if you forget your own, but please do not rely on this!

If you are unable to wear a mask for any reason, please do not come to the church worship. Online worship will continue from this site.

Sunday 2nd August the following churches will be open for worship, and will remain open afterwards for Private Prayer until 4pm.

(You will need your face mask!)

Brockdish (St. Peter & St. Paul’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer
Harleston (St. John’s): 11am Holy Communion
Scole (St. Andrew’s): 11am Morning Prayer
Redenhall (St. Mary’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer

Ken and Johnny use Zoom

Those of you who come along to the Informal Worship will have been missing Ken and Johnny and their little chats. Unfortunately, like everyone else they haven’t been able to meet up. Then they discovered Zoom. They accidentally recorded their last chat and asked me to share it with you; just in case you are missing them.

Over to Ken and Johnny…

 

Boris Johnson – What is Truth?

What is Truth?

At the trial of Jesus, Pilate the Roman governor famously asked, “What is Truth” (John 18.38) A question that seems so relevant right now. We have Trump in the USA claiming that any inconvenient truth is, “Fake News.” We have China denying that student protesters were massacred in Tiananmen Square in 1989. These are bad enough, but at least for me in England they have the comfort of being somewhere else in the world. But now there is a real danger here in the UK.

Today it is clear that Boris Johnson is the front runner to become the next Prime Minister.

I know the old joke,

Question: How do you tell when a politician is lying?

Answer: Their lips move!

Even so, until now politicians have at least recognised the existence of Truth, and expected there to be consequences if they have lied. Not so Boris Johnson. For example, just remember his tweet that he had voted during the local elections, when there were no elections in London. I wish the Conservative Party every success in choosing a leader, but for the moral integrity of that great party and of this country, I pray that they do not choose an unrepentant liar!

I am not alone in this concern for the value of Truth. Mohammed Amin, chairman of the Conservative Muslim Forum, said he would quit the Conservative Party after more than three decades as a member if Boris Johnson is chosen as their next leader.

Mr Amin told BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme: “There are many horrible people who have been popular. Popularity is not the test. The test is, is this person sufficiently moral to be prime minister, and I believe he fails that test.” … “he, as far as I’m concerned, has insufficient concern about the nature of truth for me to ever be a member of a party that he leads.” 

I must agree with Mr Amin on the importance of Truth, and that Boris Johnson is unfit to be prime minister. This is not a party political statement. I would expect all Christian Conservatives to feel the same. I must follow Jesus above all else or stop claiming to be a Christian. I must follow the same Jesus who told Pilate, “I was born into this world to tell about the truth. And everyone who belongs to the truth knows my voice.” (John 18.37)

God bless…

Services in Church on Sunday 9th August

Please remember to bring your Face Mask to church!

Please note that we are operating a strict Face Mask policy for all services in church. No exceptions. This is for the safety and reassurance of those attending. There will usually be a spare disposable mask for you to wear if you forget your own, but please do not rely on this!

Online worship will continue from this site.

On Sunday 9th August the following churches will be open for worship, and will remain open afterwards for Private Prayer until 4pm.

(You will need your face mask)

Brockdish (St. Peter & St. Paul’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer
Harleston (St. John’s): 11am Morning Prayer
Scole (St. Andrew’s): 11am Morning Prayer
Thorpe Abbotts (All Saints’): 9.30am Holy Communion

Compline – Wednesday 29th July 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by John Taylor

Now that services in church have begun again the Ministry Team do not plan to post a regular Wednesday Compline and will be varying the type of Sunday service that we offer here. Therefore this service may well be the last of our Complines. We will though listen to your requests and do our best to post the services that you appreciate most.

God bless,

Compline for Wednesday 29th July

Trinity 7 – 26th July 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such broad and inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 7, let by Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

 

A Sermon for Trinity 7, from John Taylor

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

 

Music links for the Trinity 7 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

God is Love, let heaven adore him

Hear The Call Of The Kingdom

Seek Ye First

God is working His purpose out

Build Your Kingdom Here

A Sermon(Text)

Sermon July 26th 2020

I want to look at our reading from Mathew from the end not the beginning. Jesus talks about a scribe and in his lifetime not may people could read or write. A scribe would not just write what you told him to or read what was written down but would draw up documents and contracts for you. Would translate what you wanted to say so it made sense or explain what was written so you could understand it.

When he talks about the master of a household bringing out new treasure as well as old the new he is referring to is the wonderous, bright new Kingdom to come and the old is the ancient wisdom, law and stories of the Jewish people. The new Kingdom is built on the foundations of all God’s work in what we now think of as the Old Testament.

Earlier in Mathew 5:17 Jesus tells his disciples that he has come not to abolish but to fulfil. His ministry is not changing what has gone before but enlarging and amplifying it.

When Jesus spoke in parables people were confused. Even his twelve chosen often missed the point and he had to carefully explain it to them. This time after the parables of weeds and wheat, the mustard seed, the pearls and the fish he asks his disciples outright “have you understood” “do you get it”?

When they assure him that they have he tells them that the scribes who have been trained for the Kingdom of Heaven, i.e. them, the disciples themselves should not only tell, explain and translate the wonderous new opportunity in front of them but the wisdom and benefits of what has gone before.

Today we live in strange times. Not only are we shaken out of our established routine lives by covid-19 but it seems at times as much of what we thought we knew is under attack for being wrong and evil. Statues are being thrown down and public figures we were taught to revere are portrayed as evil. Everything is wrong or right. There is no balance or nuance. What are we supposed to do, what are we to think?

If we want to follow the examples of Jesus’ teaching then thinking is exactly what we should do. Jesus taught in parables partly to get his point across and partly to make people think for themselves. To use the wisdom of the past, the good points from history as well as the bad. To learn from mistakes as well as successes. , To work forwards to the Kingdom to come but not to forget where they came from, the continuing journey which lay before them.

In order to do this the disciples had to look both backwards and forwards. Paul in his epistles did not deny the Jewish law but showed how parts of it did not apply to the gentiles.

I think for us today there is a lot we can learn from this. We have to look back not to destroy or obliterate or forget but to learn from the past. To take the bad as well as the good and to build on them. Not to be shackled by what has gone before but to acknowledge that there are things to keep as well as things to change.
We are not here to sit in judgement on others whether contemporaries or predecessors any more than we would want them sitting in judgement on us. Romans 12: 17-19 quoting Deuteronomy 32:35 “Vengeance belongs to the Lord“ It is not up to us to seek revenge. Neither should we unthinkingly condemn or exonerate but concentrate on what we think or ay or do. To try and live our lives as Jesus wants us to. That is the key for those who want to try and live as Christians to live a Christ like life.
Amen.

Services in Church on Sunday 26th July

Please remember to bring your Face Mask to church!

Please note that we are operating a strict Face Mask policy for all services in church. No exceptions. This is for the safety and reassurance of those attending. There will usually be a spare disposable mask for you to wear if you forget your own, but please do not rely on this!

If you are unable to wear a mask for any reason, please do not come to the church worship. Online worship will continue from this site.

 

Sunday 26th July the following churches will be open for worship, and will remain open afterwards for Private Prayer until 4pm.

(You will need your face mask!)

Brockdish (St. Peter & St. Paul’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer
Harleston (St. John’s): 11am Morning Prayer
Scole (St. Andrew’s): 11am Holy Communion
Redenhall (St. Mary’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer

 

Sunday 2nd August the following churches will be open for worship, and will remain open afterwards for Private Prayer until 4pm.

(You will need your face mask!)

Brockdish (St. Peter & St. Paul’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer
Harleston (St. John’s): 11am Holy Communion
Scole (St. Andrew’s): 11am Morning Prayer
Redenhall (St. Mary’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer

Compline – Wednesday 22nd July 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell.

Now that services in church have begun again the Ministry Team do not plan to post a regular Wednesday Compline and will be varying the type of Sunday service that we offer here. Therefore this service may well be the last of our Complines. We will though listen to your requests and do our best to post the services that you appreciate most.

God bless,

Compline for Wednesday 22nd July

Face Masks in Church

Please note that we are operating a strict Face Mask policy for all services in church. No exceptions. This is for the safety and reassurance of those attending. There will usually be a spare disposable mask for you to wear if you forget your own, but please do not rely on this!

If you are unable to wear a mask for any reason, please do not come to the church worship. Online worship will continue from this site.

This policy applies for any service in the following churches:

  • Billingford (St. Leonard’s)
  • Brockdish (St. Peter and St. Paul’s)
  • Harleston (St. John’s)
  • Needham (St. Peter’s)
  • Redenhall (St. Mary’s)
  • Scole (St. Andrew’s)
  • Thorpe Abbotts (All Saints’)

 

God bless,

Nigel.