Skip to content

“Put that bloody cigarette out!”

Hector Hugh Munro is better known as the humorous satirist Saki. In November 1916 he was sheltering in a shell crater near Beaumont-Hamel, during the Battle of the Ancre, when he shouted to the man next to him, “Put that bloody cigarette out!” and was shot dead by a German sniper.

In warfare snipers are an invisible killer. You don’t know you are in danger until it is too late. That is very much like the invisible killer around today. Covid-19 is around, it is serious and often deadly, but it cannot be seen. I could flout all of the precautions and never come to harm, so could you, but that would be reckless in the extreme. It would be incredibly selfish too.

Another analogy for you, brought to mind by the Battle of Britain commemorations happening this weekend. During an air raid leaving a light to be seen was illegal because it might guide an enemy bomber. However, I am sure that some left lights on and got away with it, but doing so was utterly irresponsible and selfish. You would have been putting your family and neighbours in real danger. Still at the start of the war air raid wardens were frequently laughed at and ignored.

It is bad enough to hear of so many people acting so selfishly during this crisis, but what is worse is hearing some Christians advocating such recklessness. Jesus couldn’t have made it any clearer when he said, “Love the Lord your God with all your heart, soul, and mind. This is the first and most important commandment. The second most important commandment is like this one. And it is, “Love others as much as you love yourself.” (Matthew 22.37-39) We of all people, should be looking out for the welfare of those around us, even if we are careless of danger for ourselves. We are Christ’s ambassadors here on earth, to set an example to all around us of loving care, and selfless living.

We are called to love the people around us, whoever they may be. We are called to die for the good of others, if need be. We are never called to kill them due to our selfish lack of care.

Amen.

Trinity 15 – Sunday 20th September 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such a broad range of inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 15, let by The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

A Sermon for Trinity 15, from John Taylor

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

Music links for the Trinity 15 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

For the Fruits of His Creation, Thanks Be to God

Lord, For the Years

More Modern:

Kids:

 

A Sermon(Text)

Sermon September 20th 2020

Mathew 20; 1-16

To understand what this parable might be saying to us we need to realise that the landowner is in fact God and the labourers, initially, represented Israel and now all of humanity.

The story is not principally a social commentary or a reflection on the relative bargaining positions of the TUC and the CBI but a very specific promise and warning to all of us.

The first point is that God’s grace and mercy are not a wage or salary. They are not a payment to us for services rendered. It is not a case of the more we put in or the better we are the more we get out.

The salary the landowner pays to his workers is the same no matter how hard or long they work. Jesus is not saying this to reward or encourage laziness but to emphasise that God will give us all of his love and mercy no matter how late we are in acknowledging him and turning to him.

It doesn’t matter if we have spent years denying the existence of God or the sacrifice of Jesus, the moment we accept them, turn to them and ask them into our lives we are as complete a member of the Christian family as some one who has been a regular worshipper since Sunday School.

The flip side of this is that sometimes the church, beginning with the disciples themselves, need to be reminded that it is no use pushing to the front to try and attract Jesus’ attention and expecting the best seats at his table. God treats everyone equally.

By saying that the first shall be last and the last shall be first Jesus is making the point, not just to the ancient Jewish nation and authorities but to the disciples themselves that if you think you are something special you are in for a shock. You will loose that exalted position you think is yours by rights and those at the bottom of society, the beggars, tramps and prisoners will also be surprised when they find they are just as valued and loved as everyone else.

Those who worked for an hour were paid as much as those who worked all day. God loves all of us totally. No more no less. Amen

Compline – Wednesday 16th September 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

God bless…

Compline for Wednesday 16th September

Creationtide – Sunday 13th September 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such a broad range of inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Creationtide, let by The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

A Sermon for Creationtide, from The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell (sorry to have me twice, it is just how it has worked out!)

This sermon makes reference to Matthew 25:14-30 which is copied at the end of this page. You may want to read this first before listening to the sermon.

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

Music links for the Trinity 13 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

O Lord my God, When I in Awesome Wonder (How Great Thou Art)

Go Forth and Tell

Make Me a Channel of Your Peace

More Modern:

God Of The Poor (Beauty for Brokenness)

Kids:

You make me brave

A Sermon(Text)

See Matthew 25:14-30 (copied at the end for reference)

Dear Lord, may all that is of you be heard and remembered, and all else forgotten. Amen.

I live in a beautiful part of England. Only the other day I was driving back when a glorious red deer doe jumped into the road in front of me. I was still in a village and was going slowly so I could appreciate her beauty. She looked down at me, and I looked up at her. She then snorted and effortlessly leapt over a hedge back back the way that she had come. When I looked through the hedge there was a small herd there waiting for her. Magical!

I can look up and see buzzards most days and the calls of owls fill my nights. I could go on and on about the wonder all around me, so I have no difficulty valuing Creation as God’s own work.

I love the countryside, but I have not always lived a rural life. I grew up in Middlesbrough and Thornaby, large industrial towns in the North East. But even there the wonder of Creation can be seen and adored.

To show you what I mean I will read from one of my favourite books, “Mr God this is Anna” by Fynn: Anna is upset because people, “just could not see the beauty of that broken iron stump, the colours, the crystalline shapes; they could not see the possibilities there. Anna wanted them to join with her in this exciting new world, but they could not imagine themselves to be so small that this jagged fracture could become a world of iron mountains, of iron plains with crystal trees…

Mister God most certainly enjoyed it, but then Mister God didn’t at all mind making himself small.”

All God’s creation is precious to him, and Jesus died to make the whole of creation whole, not just the bits I like, even broken iron railings and, yes, even cockroaches!

Each of us has been given into this gift of Creation. I feel like the servant given 5,000 coins by his master. You may feel the same, but even if you are more like the servant that received only 1,000 coins you still have the Creation there to love, it is just a little harder to do.

The more I let myself appreciate the wonder of Creation the more I see, the more I am able to wonder at. My 5,000 coins keep growing into more and more.

Sadly, too many people are like that servant with the 1,000 coins. They bury the gift and never appreciate a thing. Like that servant they never let the riches given to them see the light of day.

Like Anna, I think that the Creator is saddened when, “they just could not see the beauty of that broken iron stump, the colours, the crystalline shapes; they could not see the possibilities there.”

Sadly, in the darkness of separation from their Creator they are unable to see the riches given to them, and eventually even that is taken away.

Looking at the modern world around me and the challenges facing it, I become afraid. The challenges of greedy consumption, and climate change loom large.

Faced with these challenges we are all in danger of losing it all by burying our heads in the ground, and the whole of creation suffers. Or we can let our hearts sing with the wonder around us, and wondering care, cherish and protect.

Lord, open our eyes and hearts to the wonders of your Creation. That together in awe we may treasure the great riches entrusted to us.

Amen.

Matthew 25:14-30 (CEV: Contemporary English Version)

The kingdom is also like what happened when a man went away and put his three servants in charge of all he owned. 15 The man knew what each servant could do. So he handed five thousand coins to the first servant, two thousand to the second, and one thousand to the third. Then he left the country.

16 As soon as the man had gone, the servant with the five thousand coins used them to earn five thousand more. 17 The servant who had two thousand coins did the same with his money and earned two thousand more. 18 But the servant with one thousand coins dug a hole and hid his master’s money in the ground.

19 Some time later the master of those servants returned. He called them in and asked what they had done with his money. 20 The servant who had been given five thousand coins brought them in with the five thousand that he had earned. He said, “Sir, you gave me five thousand coins, and I have earned five thousand more.”

21 “Wonderful!” his master replied. “You are a good and faithful servant. I left you in charge of only a little, but now I will put you in charge of much more. Come and share in my happiness!”

22 Next, the servant who had been given two thousand coins came in and said, “Sir, you gave me two thousand coins, and I have earned two thousand more.”

23 “Wonderful!” his master replied. “You are a good and faithful servant. I left you in charge of only a little, but now I will put you in charge of much more. Come and share in my happiness!”

24 The servant who had been given one thousand coins then came in and said, “Sir, I know that you are hard to get along with. You harvest what you don’t plant and gather crops where you haven’t scattered seed. 25 I was frightened and went out and hid your money in the ground. Here is every single coin!”

26 The master of the servant told him, “You are lazy and good-for-nothing! You know that I harvest what I don’t plant and gather crops where I haven’t scattered seed. 27 You could have at least put my money in the bank, so that I could have earned interest on it.”

28 Then the master said, “Now your money will be taken away and given to the servant with ten thousand coins! 29 Everyone who has something will be given more, and they will have more than enough. But everything will be taken from those who don’t have anything. 30 You are a worthless servant, and you will be thrown out into the dark where people will cry and grit their teeth in pain.”

Compline – Wednesday 9th September 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by Lindy Ellis.

God bless…

Compline for Wednesday 9th September

Trinity 13 – Sunday 6th September 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such a broad range of inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 13, let by The Revd. Sue Auckland

 

A Sermon for Trinity 13, from Ann Cork

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

 

Music links for the Trinity 13 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

Sing of the Lord’s Goodness

Ye Holy Angels Bright

More Modern:

Jesus Stand Among Us & Here is Bread

Waiting here for you

Kids:

 

A Sermon(Text)

Compline – Wednesday 2nd September 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

God bless…

Compline for Wednesday 2nd September

 

Trinity 12 – Sunday 30th August 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such a broad range of inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 12, let by The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

A Sermon for Trinity 12, from The Revd. Sue Auckland

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

 

Music links for the Trinity 12 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

I, the lord of sea and sky

Father, hear the prayer we offer

More Modern:

Build this house

The wonderful cross

Kids:

This is amazing grace

 

A Sermon(Text)

12th Sunday after Trinity
I wonder if you’ve ever had a friend or family member that you’ve know so well, that you
think you know them through and through and then they do or say something which
confuses you and shatters your illusions of whom they are?! This of course was exactly
what happened to Peter.

In last week’s passage, Peter recognised Jesus as “the Messiah, the Son of the living
God”. This week, we find Peter scandalised as Jesus begins to speak of the suffering and
death that stand at the heart of his mission, and even though Peter knows Jesus is from
God, he just can’t help himself in speaking out! Peter’s own expectations of whom Jesus is
and why he’s come, get in the way of his listening and understanding.

In short, Peter wants the Messiah to be the Messiah he’s been expecting. He wants the
Messiah to fulfil all of his hopes and dreams. He doesn’t want a Messiah to offer
challenges that destroy his beliefs that the Messiah will oust the Romans and rule from
Jerusalem in their stead. Peter has acknowledged Jesus is from God, is God, but still his
own priorities and vision take precedence and he dares to take Jesus to one side and
suggest he’s got it wrong!

In a way, this story reminds us of the temptation of Jesus in the desert. Both Satan and
Peter’s words are meant to try to “contain and derail” God’s purposes but unlike Satan in
the desert, Peter believes that he is acting in Jesus’ best interests. After a recognising the
truth of Jesus’ identity, he can’t accept that suffering and crucifixion should be the fate in
store for Jesus, the one sent by God to ‘save his people’.

Jesus’s response to the temptations in the desert shows wisdom and his contempt for the
tempter. Jesus’s response to Peter is offered in love as well as anger. He warns him that
two spiritual forces are at war in his heart. Through Peter’s words, the Evil One is once
again tempting Christ to depart from the way of the cross.

I wonder how many of us are Peters at heart. We confess to following the living God and in
our hearts and minds we do; but how much of our own self, our own priorities, our own life
experiences influence our listening to or our interpretation of what we think God wants us
to do or be?

To find our identity within God and to allow ourselves to be shaped by God can be a hard
thing to do and it won’t happen if we don’t find time to be in God’s presence each day in
prayerful mindfulness. Asking the Holy Spirit to enlighten us and show us the way, as well
as reflecting on God’s presence in the past day, are ways that we can be more aware of
God’s presence in our lives, and also invite God’s guidance in the shaping of our lives –
yours and mine!

Most of us – myself included – spend far too much time thinking that God needs to
conform to our way of seeing things. But we are in good company, for Peter and many
others from Christian tradition have fallen into that trap too but that doesn’t mean it’s right
or OK ! By God’s grace, we can get out of it. Just as Jesus reminded Peter that he was
thinking in a human way and forgetting God’s ways, we need to remind ourselves of that
danger too. We need to allow the Holy Spirit to guide us into God’s ways and so allow him
to shape our lives,- in the little things and the big things.

God’s wisdom far surpasses our human reasoning – we just need to remember that, and
then wait, listen and follow, in the power of the Holy Spirit.

Amen.

Compline – Wednesday 26th August 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by Lindy Ellis

God bless…

Compline for Wednesday 26th August

 

 

Trinity 11 – Sunday 23rd August 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such broad and inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 11, let by Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

 

A Sermon for Trinity 11, from Lynda Mansfield

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

Music links for the Trinity 11 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

Christ is made the sure foundation

Through all the changing scenes of life

Firmly I believe and truly

More Modern:

This I Believe

Jesus Messiah

Kids:

One Thing Remains

 

A Sermon(Text)

Sermon for 11th Sunday after Trinity

Matthew 16:18 – “And I tell you that you are Peter, and on this rock I will build my church”.

In our reading we heard how Jesus told Peter that he was a rock; and on that rock he will build his church.

Ten years ago I was fortunate enough to visit Israel. On the very first morning there we were taken for a tour round the ancient town of Jaffa, which was on the outskirts of Tel Aviv. Our guide took us to the place where it is said that Peter stood and preached to the people there – and it was there that the Christian Church began. That was an amazing thought.

After our lecture, we were free to roam around the area for 20 minutes; my friend and I chose to go into St Peter’s Church nearby and we were greeted by some wonderful singing – “Seek ye first the Kingdom of God” – in English. It was a Roman Catholic Church, but we had arrived at the very time when they sang their mass in English; that was a special moment, which I have never forgotten.

We are told in the St Matthew reading that Jesus asks his disciples “Who do people say that I am?”. After their reply, He asks, but who do you say that I am? “You are the Christ, the Son of the living God” replies Peter. That was quite a confession of faith because Peter was a Jew, and the Jews of Jesus’ day believed that God would send an anointed king who would bring peace to Israel. We know that the Jewish people today are still awaiting the coming of the Messiah. But Peter and the other disciples had seen the light – Jesus was the one Israel had been waiting for.

So Jesus gave Simon Peter the new name Peter, the rock. And, he goes on to say that ‘on this rock I will build my church’ meaning that he is going to build a community of believers, and it starts there and then at Peter’s declaration.

However, Jesus asked the disciples not to tell anyone that he was the Christ. If the disciples were saying that Jesus was the true king Herod or Caesar had better look out. If the authorities found out what was being said this might precipitate his death and Jesus did not want this to come before he had finished his ministry. Jesus knew he was going to die, but he needed to complete his work on earth first.

Together we make up the rock – the foundation of the church. No ONE person is the rock In the Romans reading set for today it says “each of us has one body with many members, and these members do not all have the same function, so in Christ we who are many form one body and each member belongs to all the others”. There have been many sermons on this particular passage, but the important thing for me to mention today in conjunction with our being the rock is that we recognise that not one of us is more important than the other; we each have different gifts and different parts to play in our church and our shared faith ensures the continuance of this church and the community in our individual churches.

We are going to sing Christ is made the sure foundation at the end of our service this morning and as we focus on Him may we be as solid as a rock in our faith and in our example as Christ’s people, now and forever.

Amen.

 

Compline – Wednesday 19th August 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by The Revd. Lyndy Domoney and John Taylor

God bless…

Compline for Wednesday 19th August

 

 

The Blessed Virgin Mary – Sunday 16th August 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such broad and inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for The Blessed Virgin Mary, let by Revd. Nigel Tuffnell

 

A Sermon for The Feast of the Blessed Virgin Mary, from Jamie Worthington

Music links for this Sunday (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

Lord of all hopefulness

For Mary, mother of our Lord

More Modern:

Mary, did you know

Way Maker

Kids:

Freedom

 

Compline – Wednesday 12th August 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by The Revd. Nigel Tuffnell.

There is also a physical Compline service this Thursday (13th August) at 6pm in All Saints’ Thorpe Abbotts. You are very welcome to join us for that service, if you feel safe to do so.

God bless…

Compline for Wednesday 12th August

 

Trinity 9 – 9th August 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music (traditional, more modern and kids). Thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such broad and inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 9, let by Revd. Lyndy Domoney, with the Gospel read by Ann Cork

A Sermon for Trinity 9, from Ann Cork

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

 

Music links for the Trinity 9 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

Jesus Calls Us O’er the Tumult

Calm Me Lord by Margaret Rizza

More Modern:

Oceans (Where Feet May Fail)

My Lighthouse (with actions)

Kids:

Deep Cries Out

 

A Sermon(Text)

Compline – Wednesday 5th August 2020

This week our service of Compline (Night Prayer) is led by Lindy Ellis

God bless,

Compline for Wednesday 5th August

Trinity 8 – 2nd August 2020

Thank you for joining our online worship including our Holy Communion and a short sermon. Below them are links to a selection of music thanks once again to Stephanie Woollam for prayerfully choosing such broad and inspiring sacred music.

Please continue to share your views on the services.

God bless,

Nigel.

 

A Holy Communion for Trinity 8, let by Revd. Lyndy Domoney, with the Gospel read by Lindy Ellis

A Sermon for Trinity 8, from Lindy Ellis

(The text may be found at the bottom of this post)

Music links for the Trinity 8 (just click on the titles below to be taken to the music hosted by YouTube).

More Traditional:

Guide Me, Oh Thou Great Jehovah

Panis Angelicus

More Modern:

Hungry

You shall go out with Joy

Kids:

O Taste and See

 

A Sermon(Text)

We hear so many statistics that numbers tend to slide past our brains and mean nothing to us. Here is one more: across the world, this year over 670,000 people have already died of covid-19, and the number increases each day. 670,000! But we are overcome by such numbers; to genuinely feel compassion, I need to concentrate on individual cases – you will notice that the media news programmes usually give us the story of one particular person, after telling us a news item. So remember that each of those 670,000 had a mother, a father, brothers, sisters, sons, daughters, other family members, and friends, who are there grieving over those deaths.

For each survivor, surely the natural reaction is to want to be quiet and to be alone to pray and absorb the reality of what has happened. Imagine you are one of them, the number certainly includes many people in this country – you want to be quiet so you go for a walk to one of your favourite beauty spots, but when you get there, there is a large group of noisy people having a barbecue and ignoring social distancing. What is your reaction? I suspect that you would feel grumpy even angry and you would stomp off feeling even worse.
In light of this, Jesus’s reactions and actions in today’s Gospel are remarkable. The first sentence of the reading is ‘After Jesus heard about John, he crossed Lake Galilee to go to some place where he could be alone.’ He had just heard the most horrible news: John his cousin, who had been held in prison by Herod, had been beheaded at the whim of Herod’s wife and her daughter, and his head presented on a plate. The news would also remind Jesus that, if he continued on his present course, he would also die a violent death. No wonder Jesus wanted to be alone to talk to his Father in prayer. Surely, that was not too much to ask?

So he sailed across the lake to a quiet spot, but the crowds had got there before him. Did Jesus say, ‘Hang on, Guys, I’ve just had some bad news and I want to be on my own to mourn quietly’? No, although he would know that many of them were just sensation seekers, wanting to see him perform miracles, he could see the many sick people who had been brought the long difficult trek around the edge of the lake, and his first reaction was to be sorry for them, so he metaphorically rolled up his sleeves and cured each one dealing with each one as an individual. This took all day and it was evening by the time he had finished.

Now the disciples under Jesus’s influence would also be caring for the people too, but no doubt they were even more concerned for Jesus, their friend. They could see he was exhausted and still hadn’t been able to mourn for his cousin. Surely, the best thing would be to send all this crowd off home now. It was a huge number and they were really hungry. They, the disciples of Jesus, couldn’t do anything more to help them, could they? They had no food with them – the crowd would all just have to go home – it would be for the best.

Well, Jesus would be glad that the disciples are trying to care for the people, but he wants them to have a greater vision of what is possible for God, so his reply is, ‘They don’t have to leave. Why don’t you give them something to eat?’ The disciples respond with amazement: ‘How can we, out here in the desert? We’ve got barely anything to give them.’

This is how our vocations as Christians work: we read the Bible, we pray, we get to know Jesus a little and we try to be like him. We think of something we can offer, but Jesus replies that we need to expand our vision. No, no, I say – I can’t do that – I’m not clever enough; I can’t speak in public; I haven’t got the resources; but God pushes a bit more and we find ourselves doing things we didn’t think possible. Just think of Tom Moore – his family challenged him to raise money for the NHS before his 100th birthday. He probably thought he’d be lucky to manage even that challenge without collapsing, but he found more and more resources within himself and now he is Captain Sir Tom Moore and an inspiration to many. Of course, worldly success does not always come to Christians, in fact it rarely does – a tougher example is Martin Luther King, who showed the world how Christians can peacefully, but effectively work against evil (in his case, the evil of racism), but he was martyred by someone who could not accept the truths he spoke. Let us pray that we may have the faith and strength to follow our vocations.

Going back to our Gospel story, what happens next reminds me of the Last Supper. The words St Matthew uses in telling the two parts of the story are very similar. Jesus takes what food they have and blesses and breaks the bread, then somehow there proves to be enough for everyone, and even more than enough. This points forward to the way Jesus gave his own body for us as a sacrifice that paid for all our sins, so that we can become new people, new people who are given the grace to follow God’s will; and through all the centuries since the bread of communion has proved to be more than enough for everyone who has come to God’s table. As St John put it, ‘I am that bread from heaven! Everyone who eats it will live forever.’

So when you feel that God is calling you to act out of your comfort zone, to follow Jesus further than you thought you possibly could, remember that Jesus has been there before us and he will be right with us at all times.

Let us pray:

Dear Lord, give us your vision of what we are capable of, strengthen us and give us perseverance so we do not give up when the road ahead seems hard, give us your love, for others as well as for ourselves, so that we always try to follow your will, not our own. Amen

Services in Church on Sunday 2nd August

Please remember to bring your Face Mask to church!

Please note that we are operating a strict Face Mask policy for all services in church. No exceptions. This is for the safety and reassurance of those attending. There will usually be a spare disposable mask for you to wear if you forget your own, but please do not rely on this!

If you are unable to wear a mask for any reason, please do not come to the church worship. Online worship will continue from this site.

Sunday 2nd August the following churches will be open for worship, and will remain open afterwards for Private Prayer until 4pm.

(You will need your face mask!)

Brockdish (St. Peter & St. Paul’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer
Harleston (St. John’s): 11am Holy Communion
Scole (St. Andrew’s): 11am Morning Prayer
Redenhall (St. Mary’s): 9.30am Morning Prayer

Ken and Johnny use Zoom

Those of you who come along to the Informal Worship will have been missing Ken and Johnny and their little chats. Unfortunately, like everyone else they haven’t been able to meet up. Then they discovered Zoom. They accidentally recorded their last chat and asked me to share it with you; just in case you are missing them.

Over to Ken and Johnny…

 

Boris Johnson – What is Truth?

What is Truth?

At the trial of Jesus, Pilate the Roman governor famously asked, “What is Truth” (John 18.38) A question that seems so relevant right now. We have Trump in the USA claiming that any inconvenient truth is, “Fake News.” We have China denying that student protesters were massacred in Tiananmen Square in 1989. These are bad enough, but at least for me in England they have the comfort of being somewhere else in the world. But now there is a real danger here in the UK.

Today it is clear that Boris Johnson is the front runner to become the next Prime Minister.

I know the old joke,

Question: How do you tell when a politician is lying?

Answer: Their lips move!

Even so, until now politicians have at least recognised the existence of Truth, and expected there to be consequences if they have lied. Not so Boris Johnson. For example, just remember his tweet that he had voted during the local elections, when there were no elections in London. I wish the Conservative Party every success in choosing a leader, but for the moral integrity of that great party and of this country, I pray that they do not choose an unrepentant liar!

I am not alone in this concern for the value of Truth. Mohammed Amin, chairman of the Conservative Muslim Forum, said he would quit the Conservative Party after more than three decades as a member if Boris Johnson is chosen as their next leader.

Mr Amin told BBC Radio 4’s Today Programme: “There are many horrible people who have been popular. Popularity is not the test. The test is, is this person sufficiently moral to be prime minister, and I believe he fails that test.” … “he, as far as I’m concerned, has insufficient concern about the nature of truth for me to ever be a member of a party that he leads.” 

I must agree with Mr Amin on the importance of Truth, and that Boris Johnson is unfit to be prime minister. This is not a party political statement. I would expect all Christian Conservatives to feel the same. I must follow Jesus above all else or stop claiming to be a Christian. I must follow the same Jesus who told Pilate, “I was born into this world to tell about the truth. And everyone who belongs to the truth knows my voice.” (John 18.37)

God bless…